Why I became a multiple myeloma patient advocate

Imogen Coupe|6th March 2020

Every 20 minutes someone in the UK is told they have blood cancer. In February 2017, at just 41 years old, Peter McCleave was told he had multiple myeloma and was given seven years to live.

As an Ironman triathlete with no history of previous illnesses, his diagnosis was not expected. BLH speaks to McCleave to find out how he has fought to remain positive throughout his treatment journey while simultaneously leading a successful campaign to get more people to sign up to be a blood stem cell donor.

Multiple myeloma is a type of bone marrow cancer that often affects several areas of the body, such as the spine, skull, pelvis and ribs. According to the NHS, in the early stages, myeloma may not cause any symptoms. It’s often only suspected or diagnosed after a routine blood or urine test. The typical treatment journey for people with multiple myeloma, a disease for which a cure is yet to be found, is a series of chemotherapy treatments. Patients receiving intensive chemotherapy treatment will need an autologous stem cell transplant (transplants using the patient’s own cells rather than a donors).

Autologous stem cell transplants allow the healthy bone marrow that is affected by intensive chemotherapy treatments to recover. In this form of stem cell transplant, the stem cells are harvested from the patient themselves, damaged or diseased cells are removed and later the cells are returned to the same patient. Allogeneic transplants, another type of treatment, are when a patient receives stem cells from a matching donor.

Husband and father to two young boys, McCleave tells BLH about the care he has received, his autologous stem cell transplant, and why it is important for patients to play an active role in the treatment process.

In-progress treatments for COVID-19: an attempt to simplify things

Manos Mastorakis|27th March 2020

Senior Associate Consultant, Manos Mastorakis, takes a look at a number of COVID-19 drugs that are already registered in clinical trials, providing analysis aiming to simplify the current landscape.

read more

Why I became a multiple myeloma patient advocate

Imogen Coupe|6th March 2020

BLH speaks to MM patient advocate, Peter McCleave, to find out how he has fought to remain positive throughout his treatment journey while simultaneously leading a successful campaign to get more people to sign up to be a blood stem cell donor.

read more

Enhancing the life-cycle of your insight

Elisa del Galdo|28th February 2020

Pharmaceutical and healthcare companies invest a great deal of time and money in commissioning research to address their insight gaps. The process often results in suboptimal return on investment (ROI) due to faulty communication and inefficient documentation of insights. Amit Sheinholtz, Senior Associate User Experience Consultant and Elisa del Galdo, Head of Customer Experience discuss common pitfalls of the negative insight lifecycle and how to avoid them.

read more